How Suburban Development Makes American Cities Poorer

Thanks to Strong Towns for the work they do. If you'd like to donate, visit:
www.strongtowns.org/about-membership
For centuries, cities followed a common pattern of development, that can be seen in the design of cities all around the world. This pattern was not accidental or even inevitable, but came about over years of evolution. In the mid 20th century, America threw out all that, and started down a drastically different path - the Suburban Experiment.
This video introduces the concept of Traditional vs. Suburban development patterns, and shows some of the financials behind why suburban development simply can't compete.
More from Strong Towns:

The Cost of Auto Orientation (the original source for the data in this video)
www.strongtowns.org/journal/2012/1/2/the-cost-of-auto-orientation.html
Traditional Development - #6 in the Strong Towns Curbside Chat Video Series
Strong Towns (NLcameras):
nlcameras.info/wiki/en3dnqFoyV3RzoI/video
What is Traditional Development?
www.strongtowns.org/journal/2019/6/14/traditional-development
The Power of Information Equity
www.strongtowns.org/journal/2019/10/8/the-power-of-information-equity
America's Suburban Experiment
www.strongtowns.org/curbside-chat-1/2015/12/14/americas-suburban-experiment
This is the End of the Suburban Experiment
www.strongtowns.org/journal/2020/4/27/this-is-the-end-of-the-suburban-experiment
Traditional Development is Not Retro. It's Timeless.
www.strongtowns.org/journal/2019/9/25/traditional-development-is-not-retro-its-timeless
The Mailbox: Tower Historic Harbor "Renaissance"
www.strongtowns.org/journal/2010/5/5/the-mailbox-tower-historic-harbor-renaissance.html
The Cost of Development, Walker Industrial Park
www.strongtowns.org/journal/2010/3/17/the-cost-of-development-walker-industrial-park.html
Taco John's (Thumbnail Image)
Highplains-scout, Wikipedia:
commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Taco_John%27s_Drive_Thru_Restaurant,_Cheyenne,_WY.JPG
Give Yourself the Green Light (1954) (Public Domain)
Henry Jamison Handy
archive.org/details/GiveYour1954
Shopping Can Be Fun: A New Concept in Merchandising (1957) (Public Domain)
Kelley (George H.)
archive.org/details/Shopping1957
Taco John's review by Cynthia Endriss
goo.gl/maps/YiFxopiwyrbF2RNT9
Closed Taco Bell
Bradley Gordon (Flickr)
www.flickr.com/photos/icanchangethisright/3693952684/
Aerial footage from Google Earth Studio:
earth.google.com/studio/
Street photos from Google Street View
Chapters:
0:00 Intro
0:17 Introduction to Traditional Development
1:18 The Suburban Experiment
2:36 Taco John's Case Study
5:31 Big Box vs. Downtown Case Study
5:53 Fragility vs. Flexibility
6:49 Conclusion
7:36 Outro

Reacties 

  1. Not Just Bikes

    Not Just Bikes

    9 dagen geleden

    Strong Towns does a lot of great work on the financial sustainability of cities. If you'd like to donate, vist: www.strongtowns.org/about-membership I've also seen that this week is Strong Towns Member Week. Anyone who contributes $50, or $10 monthly, will receive a free t-shirt. So that's kinda neat. I donate to Strong Towns monthly, but I otherwise have no connection to them; I just think they're awesome and deserve more exposure.

    • Kirk Rotger

      Kirk Rotger

      4 dagen geleden

      Great video! Would you ever consider making a video on accessibility in Amsterdam? One of the biggest, and probably most legitimate concerns that I come across when talking about getting rid of street parking and generally making places more bike and pedestrian friendly is how the elderly and disabled will be able to access local stores and homes. I know you talk about this a bit in your microcar video, but what are the other ways that the city makes life easier for people who are less mobile.

    • Michael Smith

      Michael Smith

      8 dagen geleden

      Rather than donate, I'd like to vote with my feet. From you other videos I see you researched and decided on the Netherlands as a good place to live. Any chance you could do a video that gives tips on how others might follow in your footsteps?

    • KootFloris

      KootFloris

      9 dagen geleden

      I fear companies like Walmart pay council people to vote them in, rather than out. Your logic makes for better quality of life and more profits for everyone. Yet the US and Canada partially too. The few companies seek to maximize profits. And everyone loses, planet, people & community. But I fear for many US citizens this too socialist. (which it is not, but propaganda exceeds sense).

    • Adam Valt

      Adam Valt

      9 dagen geleden

      loved the cities skylines part :))

    • Reese

      Reese

      9 dagen geleden

      Don't stop making videos! Your channel is a goldmine.

  2. George Emil

    George Emil

    36 minuten geleden

    This is interesting but I think Covid 19 is turning this all upside down. With mandated lockdowns leaving only essential services open, only the big bix stores are able to endure while small businesses are closing down. That means big box stores in suburban shopping plazas will survive while urban street front shops are dying.

  3. Chac Mool

    Chac Mool

    2 uur geleden

    Maybe that >was< the point all along, to reduce tax burdens and starve the beast. 😭

  4. quartersense

    quartersense

    2 uur geleden

    I don't understand how and why american suburbs can't replace some of the unused land or the space of 3 or 4 houses for a general convenience store or something? Surely the shop would benefit from local business, and the suburb has a shop nearby?

  5. Edysin Simon

    Edysin Simon

    3 uur geleden

    The suburban experiment is over!

  6. Rusty Mason

    Rusty Mason

    4 uur geleden

    Another thing about modern American development: Franchises suck most of the value-added out of the community and send it far off, usually to Wall Street and other big corporations. The profit/value-added from non-franchised businesses stays in that community, making everyone there a little richer.

  7. Dez Londes

    Dez Londes

    10 uur geleden

    Cities are not conducive to a strong healthy family, they are simply meat markets for the sex obsessed (Yes, I've been to Europe and South America). Most stable people raising a family don't want or need the dirty, nasty, predatory nature of the cities, it breeds Marxists.

  8. Chloé Elimam

    Chloé Elimam

    18 uur geleden

    In the 1940s the US was still recovering from the Great Depression. FDR proposed the New Deal, which was a series of programs and public works projects to attempt to rejuvenate our economy and it helped a lot. He's the only president to have served 4 terms. Building highways was part of the New Deal and even though it led to "soul crushingly sterile" subburbs and zoning, it also brought our county back from Hoover Towns. It may not be pretty, or effective now but it is part of our history and culture. I'm subscribing to you because I like what you're arguing for but it's lame to alienate a whole nation of people just so you can "trash talk America."

  9. Suace X

    Suace X

    18 uur geleden

    The cities are nice until it's election year

  10. Geralt Rivia

    Geralt Rivia

    22 uur geleden

    6:45 : No scenario where all these businesses disappear at once Covid Lockdown: Hold my beer

  11. Cleate Rose

    Cleate Rose

    Dag geleden

    What arrogance! Just because he likes living in cities he thinks the rest of us should live in cities also. I grew up in Germany and wouldn't trade my suburban home in the US for the "walk able" lifestyle he's in love with. I like having a yard for my dogs and a garage to tinker in. I like space between myself and my neighbors, we get along better that way. I like privacy and peace of mind that comes with that extra space. I like having self determination over my tiny slice of America, the ability to do things without asking multiple masters for their permission. He can live in his rat cage along with as many other rats as he likes. America has space and we don't have to live that way if we don't want to.

  12. Monkey Master

    Monkey Master

    Dag geleden

    In the case study, you talked about, you made it seem as if that crowded lot that kept changing businesses because it was "flexible." Is that really the case though? Are you implying the town suddenly stopped liking liquor, got crazy for guns, then got old and wanted antiques? Look, I'm no expert, but opening a business is not like buying clothes. It takes an incredible amount of effort, commitment and logistics to run even a small business. I'm operating under the assumption that most business want to stay around for as long as they. A business closure or a resolving set of business around one location, would indicate to me that those business failed to earn the profit they desired. Couldn't the actual reason be that the businesses failed due to the lousy location? Also, I would look further into tax collection. It seemed to be that there were 3-4 business in that single location, and yet it's tax collection only seemed to about 20% higher than a single taco shop. Look, I am just trying to ask some questions here. It seems to me, that you desire to use land to it's utmost utilization. I, personally don't care for this and prefer open spaces. However, I do think there is room for both concepts.

  13. hbarudi

    hbarudi

    Dag geleden

    All because of those zoning laws that need to be repealed...

  14. terravarious

    terravarious

    Dag geleden

    However the housing prices in the suburbs would suggest that a very large portion of us have ZERO interest in living in a crime riddled city. I don't have an office job, I don't have yuppy hobbies, my job requires a large assortment of tools and hardware, likewise my hobbies require a lot of space. I don't have to walk, take an uber, or even a train to find quiet greenspace to enjoy, I simply step out my back door. If the rat warrens of a busy city appeal to you then you do you Booboo, but don't assume the rest of us would be happy there.

  15. Jesse Hitch

    Jesse Hitch

    Dag geleden

    I watched the original Strong Towns talks from about 9 years ago, including the one this video is based on, and good god, they are really racist and christian. "From a taco joint, comes meth labs" or "this area here produces a lot of tax revenue, but it's ugly, run down, there's a lot of out of wedlock births. We could maybe improve it with a cop or two on this corner". This is to say "this area is not gentrified enough, also tacos attract meth addicts" The phrase "taco trucks on every corner" was used by the activist Marco Gutierrez, the co-founder of Latinos for Trump, on September 1, 2016, in comments that received widespread attention during the 2016 United States presidential elections. During an interview with MSNBC, Gutierrez referred to his Mexican heritage, stating that "My culture is a very dominant culture, and it's imposing and it's causing problems. If you don't do something about it, you're going to have taco trucks on every corner." Another thing that was weird was how close the problems he came when speaking of the problems with things like churches. "I go to church, but churches don't pay taxes..." And instead of saying "churches should pay taxes" he diverted entirely from that point. There was also no mention of white flight or redlining in American which is much to blame for why the american suburb was so popularized. Overall, a lot of good information, but so peppered with racism and religion that it felt strange and archaic. I agree that we should have less car centric areas and more options for transit, more trees, more intuitive street design with less unnecessary signage, but none of that requires anyone to be married, or less tacos. The problem isn't the taco joint, the problem is big box stores registered in different states and countries and fast food chains vs mom and pop stores and small stores that aren't chains. There's a lot of failure to address how evil the private sector is and how detrimental capitalism is when left unfettered. There was a lot of pointing to a very libertarian view of "we need less regulation around planning of our cities", but I don't think that's the case. I think we need better planning, not less planning.

  16. Tom PM

    Tom PM

    Dag geleden

    Wal-Mart only stay in one place for 15 years??? That's the most mindblowing thing here.

  17. Dan Harris

    Dan Harris

    2 dagen geleden

    The American Dream is a nightmare.

  18. Eric N

    Eric N

    2 dagen geleden

    I donated to StrongTowns

  19. Toshihiko Tanaka

    Toshihiko Tanaka

    2 dagen geleden

    So, cities skylines basically simulated city planning the wrong way....

  20. Hei Nu Chung

    Hei Nu Chung

    2 dagen geleden

    I do believe in the future their will be a reckoning as people move toward driving as a subscription due to autonomy. What to do with all that land for parking in our suburbs and our downtowns.

  21. Hei Nu Chung

    Hei Nu Chung

    2 dagen geleden

    I have seen it over and over again big box leaves then is vacant forever. Our mall shops left mall and just moved out to “outdoor mall.” Makes no sense to me

  22. Hei Nu Chung

    Hei Nu Chung

    2 dagen geleden

    I think English cities have a nice design with a high road flanked by toe homes with shops and cheap apartments above those shops on the high road. They did get crazy with large council flats very tall but for the most part high road flanked by townhomes sometimes broken up into small apartments .

  23. Clayton Stephens

    Clayton Stephens

    2 dagen geleden

    Biggest issue is size of lot?

  24. Sharon Jacob

    Sharon Jacob

    3 dagen geleden

    I personally love living in rural America-no suburbs-no city noise-just land for miles, and a few neighbors.

    • Lintang Sinatriyo

      Lintang Sinatriyo

      10 uur geleden

      I like too but the problem is sometimes you need to drive for miles to get what you need.I live in a suburb but i can get anything by just walking

    • SFS116

      SFS116

      Dag geleden

      I do, too. If I can't live in the country, however, I'll take a suburb any day over an urban area. I like to drive and I like the schools. I also like the quieter life than an urban area has.

  25. Ryan C

    Ryan C

    3 dagen geleden

    Hey! That’s *_my_* depressingly, soul-crushingly dystopian, car-dependant city! 🥲

  26. A.J. Steinman

    A.J. Steinman

    3 dagen geleden

    2:16 An experiment disproving a hypothesis is still a successful experiment; an experiment is only failed if it fails to yield data.

  27. Maxwell Jacobs

    Maxwell Jacobs

    3 dagen geleden

    Interesting that they claim the crowded, boisterous, row-style shops with dense masses of people is more comfortable. I know quite a large number of people who would consider that extraordinarily uncomfortable. Not to mention, in the age of COVID, that type of shopping and style of store is just a massive health risk in comparison to a supermarket.

  28. egg egg

    egg egg

    3 dagen geleden

    they wont fix it, theyll just demolish it or make another one somewhere else )^ : the amount of PARKING LOT SPAAAAAACEEEE america has freaks me the hell out as european immigrant

  29. Linsey

    Linsey

    3 dagen geleden

    Thank you for spreading this information. Your videos might actually help save America. Dude, you are basically a super hero.

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      3 dagen geleden

      Don't thank me, thank StrongTowns.org. They may actually help save America.

  30. Ronin1973

    Ronin1973

    3 dagen geleden

    Store parking lots don't make money. The parking lots a more massive than the business that sits within it. But you need them in automobile dependent cities. In fact there are mandates for a minimum of parking spaces.

  31. peterinbrat

    peterinbrat

    3 dagen geleden

    Two chalupas for $5? SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY!!!

  32. peterinbrat

    peterinbrat

    3 dagen geleden

    Towns are killing downtown shopping by expensive parking without any thought other than it being a means to generate revenue. U have no issue with premium parking being expensive, but having to walk 5 blocks to get to a storefront and still pay for parking is going to send ppl to the malls.

  33. Jude Peppers

    Jude Peppers

    3 dagen geleden

    I wish more of Canada was these medium density mixed-use buildings, there's thankfully a few areas with them in my city (Outremont, Ville-Marie, Plateau, Verdun, etc) but so much of it is just endless suburbia especially poor in the north. Can't believe they would have razed old montreal to build a speedway if it werent for that one dutch dude in the 60s.

  34. Anco

    Anco

    3 dagen geleden

    'Timesaving Superhighways'

  35. Bung Kusi

    Bung Kusi

    3 dagen geleden

    Or just cramped everyone in 1 spot (new york style), and have it's value sky rocket. Then have lots of empty spot.

  36. Heidi Thompson

    Heidi Thompson

    3 dagen geleden

    I got a Ford truck ad before this video. It's like they know what you're up to.

  37. A P

    A P

    3 dagen geleden

    Of course urban areas are more dense than suburban areas, so they have more tax revenue...

  38. KILLKING110

    KILLKING110

    4 dagen geleden

    You do know piling people on top of each other like New York city creates more mental health and anger management issues right

  39. zi zhou

    zi zhou

    4 dagen geleden

    parking cost space and therefore money, duh?

  40. HowTwo DoStuff

    HowTwo DoStuff

    4 dagen geleden

    No next episode for me. BTW I’m a registered Arch with +16 years of experience and what you are talking about only makes sense from a vert skewed perspective. Firstly Cities are a general term and is not appropriate to distinguish and area form a suburb. What you should say is a densely populated area because cities can be small too. I can walk with my kids in a suburb but in Italy, Greece, Seattle, New York, and Miami you are constantly walking into homeless, drug addicts, etc.

  41. HowTwo DoStuff

    HowTwo DoStuff

    4 dagen geleden

    Super bias uh?

  42. Tim

    Tim

    4 dagen geleden

    voice over: the suburbia is soul crushingly sterile and devoid of life me wanting to live in the suburbs later: 👁👄👁

    • TheCandyexterminator

      TheCandyexterminator

      Dag geleden

      @Scott Anno I cannot tell if you're ironic or not

    • Scott Anno

      Scott Anno

      2 dagen geleden

      This guy doesn't understand the USA, or is full of it. We have suburbs so that the hoards of minorities are kept at arms length. We drive because public transit would bring slums to our neighborhoods. We have gated communities to ensure our kids aren't harassed by hobos walking on the sidewalks

  43. 1 2

    1 2

    4 dagen geleden

    I like the space and intimacy of US urban development, you should explain what taxation is based on. I think the problem of lack of population and thereof comercial businesses could be fixed with one block here and there

  44. Joshua Lee

    Joshua Lee

    4 dagen geleden

    Retail is totally dying too dont forget. Delivery is the new shops

  45. Joshua Lee

    Joshua Lee

    4 dagen geleden

    Brainerd will never get dense. Theres no need. If you want dense move to mineapolis

  46. Silver Temples

    Silver Temples

    4 dagen geleden

    I've recently come from a city in Europe where I had never owned a car for 10 years to California where my first year of commuting felt like I was living in the car. Great video! Subscribing, yo!

  47. King Cat

    King Cat

    4 dagen geleden

    "The city is left with a giant empty site." Well, conspiracy nuts would counter with "FEMA CAMPS BRO."

  48. Linuxman777

    Linuxman777

    4 dagen geleden

    Nice showing of beaver, it is a beautiful town, more beautiful than Greensburg where I live, Both are very walkable but there is more to do In Greensburg. Also Greensburg has a more Appalachain style feel while Beaver PA has a more midwest town feel.

  49. Mansacktastical

    Mansacktastical

    4 dagen geleden

    "Freedom is the enemy of creativity, limitations are its savior."

  50. Conrad Vancouver

    Conrad Vancouver

    4 dagen geleden

    “Freedom on the roads” - hah! Living hell. Some of the worst times of my life were driving. Easily, the most unpleasant thing I do is drive. Have always had a car, but I am a cyclist. Transit? Even though we’re 4 mins walk from one of the world’s greatest systems - Vancouver’s Skytrain, take it just a handful of times per year. Generally only after having cycled too far, too late. This year I took public transit twice - doesn’t even occur to me to take it. There’s a good line in a Ted talk by Kunstler - that at an intersection bounded by parking lots of big box stores you can see the curvature of the earth; places not worth caring about; fighting over. Maybe Americans wouldn’t be such fat waddlers if their enviro made them walk farther than their car door. Not Just Bikes is great. Happy to see you appreciate About Here - about Vancouver. That’s great too. Looking forward to the next.

  51. Memento Mori Moretta

    Memento Mori Moretta

    4 dagen geleden

    Can you do a video about moving to the Netherlands 😕🤔

  52. Shivam Singh

    Shivam Singh

    4 dagen geleden

    7:23 Mississauga ?

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      4 dagen geleden

      Vaughan

  53. djwestbrook36

    djwestbrook36

    5 dagen geleden

    Personally, it seems like all the cities are headed back towards walkable vibes in America. Condos and bike lanes seem to be all the rage these days

    • djwestbrook36

      djwestbrook36

      5 dagen geleden

      @Not Just Bikes Good point. As someone who lives in Brooklyn and previously in Washington DC...this issue doesn't affect me personally as much. But I have traveled around. One thing I did realize is that there are a significant amount of people who like their communities sterile and suburban. I personally have no idea why anybody would prefer that lifestyle, but I do realize they want it. So I do respect their decision to live as they choose. However, I believe the trend (at least) in the cities, is going the right direction.

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      5 dagen geleden

      Yes, but not fast enough, and they're still building more financially insolvent suburbia than they are bike lanes and condos.

  54. Tech Help Portal

    Tech Help Portal

    5 dagen geleden

    What does taxes have to do with this

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      5 dagen geleden

      It's the subject of the video?

  55. Alexandra S

    Alexandra S

    5 dagen geleden

    I grew up and still live in downtown Chicago, which is similar to European cities where everything is within walking distance and I only use my car for buying a lot of stuff and drive to work some days. I have friends and family who live in areas where you need a car to do everything and it is a sad way to live

  56. Stefano sto

    Stefano sto

    5 dagen geleden

    You are right but of the USA and Canada you are showing the worst case scenario that you can get

  57. Ivan Kotzev

    Ivan Kotzev

    5 dagen geleden

    I've lived in the U.S. suburbia. There are several big challenges with the lifestyle, including kids being dependent on their parents to go anywhere and always having either me or my wife not drinking when going out.

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      5 dagen geleden

      Yep. I have a video about why we won't raise our kids in suburbia. I probably should make a video about drunk driving some day.

  58. WaysideWorks

    WaysideWorks

    5 dagen geleden

    i never thought i'd be so interested in city planning, well done

  59. Teodor Stefanov

    Teodor Stefanov

    5 dagen geleden

    I think that the suburbs are not failed. Just st from now the lifestyle is changing. In the he past decade you have to drive to go where you want I the world.

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      5 dagen geleden

      Car-dependant suburbs have failed because they're not financially solvent. Whatever they will be in the future, they will have to be different than they are now. www.strongtowns.org/journal/2017/1/9/the-real-reason-your-city-has-no-money

  60. Soul Glow

    Soul Glow

    5 dagen geleden

    this may explain (among other factors) why so many suburbanites are moving closer to cities. but at the same time, I doubt (considering consumption patterns) cities will abandon this type of planning. what I miss about city life is the ability to WALK. nobody walks when you live outside of the city and the scenery is so blah. time to move

  61. Late Night Thinker

    Late Night Thinker

    6 dagen geleden

    Please, rant more about how shitty North American urban planning is, I'm begging you

  62. Buggi

    Buggi

    6 dagen geleden

    7:19 Actually, you have shown it makes government poorer, not the people. Large stores are generally cheaper than small shops, which increases purchasing power of the people. Also, smaller tax means smaller cost to pass on to customers.

    • Robert

      Robert

      5 dagen geleden

      @Buggi No but it improves the city

    • Buggi

      Buggi

      5 dagen geleden

      @Not Just Bikes Ultimately businesses pay with many from their customers, so more real estate tax revenue means people had paid more for their goods and services, which probably does not make them richer.

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      No, because ultimately the city needs to pay for the infrastructure, and if the businesses can't pay, then the money has to come from somewhere else. And there's no "smaller tax": it's the city getting money from only one tennant instead of many on the same block. The businesses still pay tax, and won't have anything to pass on to their customers, but it won't be enough to cover the infrastructure.

  63. Buggi

    Buggi

    6 dagen geleden

    6:15 Wait, what the f...? They just move to new building nearby after lease ends?

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      Yes. Walmart talk openly about this on their investor calls. They don't want to occupy old buildings, and their building requirements change so they regularly move. They'll also lobby the government of the town next door to give them tax incentives to move there, and then they'll occupy a building there for 15-20 years, rinse and repeat. Governments do this because they're desperate for growth (any growth) and it's politically beneficial to bring a Walmart to town (even if it ultimately costs the city more than it makes back in tax). www.strongtowns.org/journal/2016/3/3/the-walmart-trophy www.planetizen.com/node/53922

  64. James the Other One

    James the Other One

    6 dagen geleden

    Comparing revenue on a per acre basis is a false comparison. Land is cheap in suburbia. Land is expensive in built urban areas. There is MUCH more square taxable acres (more like miles) in modern suburban developments than in old cities. Your (Strong Town's) argument also ignores that the government doesn't have control over properties, they are privately owned and so those properties aren't maximized for government's greatest utility (taxable value) but for the owner's (rents/revenues at the minimum overhead costs). This impedes "redevelopment" of areas until they get so bad that they become worthless and no one complains (sues) when the government or a developer moves in. This is why inner cities languish in decrepitude while suburban areas grow with modern commerce. That is never going to change unless you/they are making the argument for socialistic wide scale takings (eminent domain on steroids)? There are plenty of suburbs in Europe. All you were showing was the same old-city landscapes that you can find in the centers of American cities (just... not as old). What you call "sterile and lifeless" is the freedom from being crammed in apartments and row houses, and being able to enjoy having real estate, which is how most wealth is built for the lower to mid middle class. It only looks barren and character-less to you, the smug outsider. To each of those homeowners, that cookie-cutter clone development house, is intensely personal to them.

    • James the Other One

      James the Other One

      6 dagen geleden

      @Not Just Bikes You are mistaking regulation with incentivization. Municipalities impose regulation to avoid the "tragedy of the commons" problem. Those regulations are ostensibly the will of and made law by the people when they elect politicians etc. And people like their suburbs. When politicians push roads and utilities out, they are doing it because someone (who has usually contributed to their re-election fund) wants to make money, not because they want to make tax revenues I mean, they do, but it not the primary motive. Strong Towns is just wishful thinking to solve a problem that doesn't exist with ideas that are completely divorced from the reality of urban management.

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      @James the Other One I'm sorry, but this is just incorrect. The zoning, minimum parking requirements, and other regulations that have been put in place in American cities makes it impossible to build in any other style than the suburban style of development. You cannot say that this is due to "demand from people" when the choice has been limited by regulation. And yes, cities are building infrastructure without demand from developers, because they are desperate for growth. Read the links I provided. Strong Towns was started by civil engineers working on building towns. You simply are not informed on this. www.strongtowns.org/journal/2016/11/4/the-myth-of-revealed-preference-for-the-suburbs www.strongtowns.org/journal/2020/8/28/the-growth-ponzi-scheme-a-crash-course

    • James the Other One

      James the Other One

      6 dagen geleden

      @Not Just Bikes You've played too much Sim City. I didn't miss your point, its just incorrect. Cities exist because there is a demand from people for the goods and services they provide. Governments are only there to facilitate that. They do not build infrastructure on whim or because they want to command people to build and live there. They do so at the request of developers and people where they want it. American cities are going bankrupt for much larger macroeconomic reasons than just how much square footage they use.

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      No, you have completely missed the point, and you don't understand how city planning works. The suburban spaces exist because cities build infrastructure to them. That infrastructure has a cost (in particular, a replacement cost) and they tax the owners to pay. But the suburban development style does not cover the cost of that infrastructure. Plus Governments absolutely do have control over almost everything done, through zoning laws and regulations. The Taco John's was built that way (especially with the amount of parking it has) entirely due to government regulations (i.e., minimum parking requirements). It was not some kind of "free market" development in any way. In this case, the city even paid to demolish the old block. You really should read more about what Strong Towns has to say. This is important, as it is literally bankrupting American cities: www.strongtowns.org/journal/2020/8/28/the-growth-ponzi-scheme-a-crash-course

  65. Scott Covert

    Scott Covert

    6 dagen geleden

    Literally none of this information is relevant until you understand how the mass production of cars in the 20th Century lead to transforming our economy, our way of life, and our city planning. Read: Thanks a lot Henry Ford 🙄

  66. ro muhamedim ben

    ro muhamedim ben

    6 dagen geleden

    The Q is why do people like living in the suburbs, downtown is noisy, polluted where you'd find yourself paying for a expensive matches boxes. If something did exist for centuries, it must have some validity, but it doesn't mean it eternal. Example: most people lived in villages and in the countryside for ever, most people in developed countries now, live in cities. The cities at first were horrible for the general public to say the least. All European cities have suburbs, it's just they're not as good as the american's ( take all the Paris beyond the circulaire high way, really ugly)

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      You are missing the point. Any development needs to pay for itself. Suburban development does not, and American cities are going bankrupt as a result. Read on to learn more: www.strongtowns.org/journal/2020/8/28/the-growth-ponzi-scheme-a-crash-course

  67. Canyon Overlook

    Canyon Overlook

    6 dagen geleden

    Are you familiar with the book Streets for People by Rudofsky? www.amazon.com/Streets-People-Americans-Bernard-Rudofsky/dp/0385042310#ace-g7448806443 Have you read any of Ivan Illich's work like Energy and Equity, Toward a History of Needs or Tools for Conviviality?

  68. the spaceman

    the spaceman

    6 dagen geleden

    Well, unabomber was right. We made cars and built cities around cars, now we can't even go shopping without a car.

  69. caulkins69

    caulkins69

    6 dagen geleden

    1:02 Where is "Beaver (USA)"? Did you mean: Beaver, Alaska; Beaver, Arkansas; Beaver, Iowa; Beaver, Kansas; Beaver, Kentucky; Beaver, Beaver Township, Bay County, Michigan; Beaver, Baldwin Township, Delta County, Michigan; Beaver, Minnesota; Beaver, Ohio; Beaver, Oklahoma; Beaver, Oregon; Beaver, Pennsylvania; Beaver, Utah; Beaver, Washington; Beaver, West Virginia; Beaver, Clark County, Wisconsin; Beaver, Marinette County, Wisconsin; or Beaver, Polk County, Wisconsin?

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      That's for you to guess.

  70. Interstellar Whale

    Interstellar Whale

    6 dagen geleden

    what always surprises me, have they never heard of parking garages in north america? those huge parking lots are so ugly.

    • Az Az

      Az Az

      6 dagen geleden

      Parking garages are very expensive to build and may have tax consequences. Parking lots are a pain to plan and build (had to deal with it for our church), but are cheaper to maintain. In the suburbs, exurbs and rural areas garages are not a good investment.

  71. Bill Cobb

    Bill Cobb

    6 dagen geleden

    Canada may have tons of American style suburbia, but they have also been able to maintain very strong and vibrant center cities (not just downtowns) at the same time something America has dramatically failed at.

  72. Midgard Eagle

    Midgard Eagle

    6 dagen geleden

    Can I just say I love this comments thread? Every comment seems to be meaningful and reply threads actually discuss things, there's no endless stupid meme templates or pointless bickering. It's actually enjoyable to read the comments for once.

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      I moderate the comments section, but actually this one has not been to bad. A few people needed to be shadowbanned because they were just spouting obscenities, but it's been mostly good.

  73. cervus

    cervus

    6 dagen geleden

    Any architecture students here? One from Slovenia here.

  74. sickofthewest

    sickofthewest

    6 dagen geleden

    There are more than two choices. The one I prefer doesn't exist yet (or probably ever, since people gravitate to something familiar). It looks like multistorey blocks to some extent (but a new Hunderwasser could pretty it up enough), but not in towers. Instead of towers (which mean that any fire beneath you is going to roast you and then burn the roast if you don't know how to walk through it), build ... "long things". ("Walls" sounds too restrictive.) Build "roads in the air" with houses and other useful things in between them. Imagine something 5km long, with a "road" on every 5 floors ... OK you're in luck because a Skype is being brought my way, so you'll be spared the TL;DR too BAD

    • sickofthewest

      sickofthewest

      6 dagen geleden

      OK I need to add some detail to that, otherwise I'm describing a nightmare. In front of the very-long-high-block you have a 2km no-build/ some-low-build zone. This is for parks, "Kleingartens", golf courses, bridle paths, cricket fields, etc (depending on what there's demand for). There's more, but I'll just stop with removing the potentially nightmarish aspects like this.

  75. Navdeep Singh

    Navdeep Singh

    6 dagen geleden

    Since your videos were more popular among Dutch audience compare to any other region, I'm curious is there any change in audience demograph after releasing last 2 videos on N American cities?

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      It's now 25% Netherlands, 21% USA, 8% UK.

  76. Adhika Sigit

    Adhika Sigit

    6 dagen geleden

    nice They Might Be Giants reference dude

  77. D

    D

    6 dagen geleden

    Just accept that the US is the US and Europe is Europe.

    • Robert

      Robert

      5 dagen geleden

      @caulkins69 I dont see that quote said anywhere, but that would improve america alot haha

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      @caulkins69 That's ridiculous. Regardless of what you might think of government, any development needs to pay for itself. As it stands right now, American suburban development cannot pay for itself, and American cities are going bankrupt. Read the link I provided, and remember that Strong Towns was started by fiscal conservative Republicans.

    • caulkins69

      caulkins69

      6 dagen geleden

      @Not Just Bikes If the government gets less tax revenue, that is a good thing. We need to starve the beast, not feed it.

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      No, that's stupid. Strong Towns was started by Americans. Suburban development is literally bankrupting US cities. You're going to ignore that because "Europe"?! www.strongtowns.org/journal/2020/8/28/the-growth-ponzi-scheme-a-crash-course

    • caulkins69

      caulkins69

      6 dagen geleden

      Thank you! I'm so tired of this relentless drumbeat that "the U.S. needs to be more like Europe."

  78. dkchen

    dkchen

    6 dagen geleden

    You have to blame residence for these things. I remember once a group wanted to build a grocery store somewhere and the biggest complaint was that there would not be enough parking and traffic was going to be bad.

  79. bryan Jaeck

    bryan Jaeck

    6 dagen geleden

    If your view is so correct why did I see lots of European towns with suburbs, cars, busses, bikes, trains for transportation? Every European we knew had car, drove to town and shopping. Yes there I some folks living in town but many live out. There are high speed rails to take you to work in big cities like London and you live 60 plus miles away. Property value is based on time to get to the big urban cities, just like the US. My Sister lives in rural England and finds where the new high speed rails will go to Edinburgh, buys homes, fixes them up sells for the big increase in value when the high speed rail goes in. Sorry your view is very biased and incorrect for much of Europe.

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      This video is not about Europe. It's about suburban development vs traditional. The UK also has suburban development, and it is also less fincancially productive than its traditional development. I'm amazed you missed the point so badly.

  80. B P

    B P

    6 dagen geleden

    I think part of the reason this continues is that economic segregation is desired by most of the people with most of the money.

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      Well, in almost every analysis Strong Towns has done in the US, affluent neighbourhoods pay less tax and require more services than poor neighbourhoods. So yeah, the people who could change it really aren't motivated to do so: www.strongtowns.org/journal/2017/1/10/poor-neighborhoods-make-the-best-investment

  81. Proto Rhinocerator

    Proto Rhinocerator

    6 dagen geleden

    I live in the suburbs. No riots in the street where they burn down the buildings and beat war drums all night. Your video makes it sound like the only point of living is the profitability of the real estate.

    • Proto Rhinocerator

      Proto Rhinocerator

      6 dagen geleden

      @Not Just Bikes OK...

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      There are many reasons the suburbs are a problem, but this video is only about the tax value of the real estate. It's in the title. Videos on NLcameras are often about a single topic.

  82. Nick C

    Nick C

    6 dagen geleden

    Not to mention, even at their peak, the kind of chain stores that occupy those “developed” blocks funnel money out of the town. Meanwhile the downtowns of yore keep most of their revenue circulating in the local economy.

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      6 dagen geleden

      Yup! Strong Towns has a follow up article to this that shows the traditional businesses put more into the local economy by hiring local accountants, marketers, etc. www.strongtowns.org/journal/2012/1/4/the-lost-opportunity-of-auto-orientation.html

  83. ezyryder11

    ezyryder11

    6 dagen geleden

    There are plenty of US cities that are well designed where you can get buy without a car. Chicago, Philadelphia, NYC, San Francisco, & Boston. And small cities like Davis, CA, Champaign, IL, and other college towns. Portland, Minneapolis, and lots of California cities have great bike lanes.

  84. Steve Hayes

    Steve Hayes

    6 dagen geleden

    shout out to Brattleboro at 6:47

  85. Casey Kreie

    Casey Kreie

    7 dagen geleden

    Great video to show your mayor.

  86. Robin Berghuijs

    Robin Berghuijs

    7 dagen geleden

    But why is one type of development worth so much more? Is that entirely due to its flexibility, or is there more to it? Or is that one of the famous "but I'll talk about that in more detail in a future video"?

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      7 dagen geleden

      Property tax is almost always based on the property valuation of the buildings on the lot. But since the lot is now mostly parking lot and "greenspace" it is simply not worth as much. If they had removed the old buildings and replaced it with new buildings in the same "traditional development" style, the lot would be worth several times more, because those new buildings would house multiple tenants and have higher property values. This is why many planners advocate a "land value tax", based on the value of the land itself. In that case, both lots would have the same tax valuation. But that's extremely rarely used, for various reasons.

  87. Peter Slegers

    Peter Slegers

    7 dagen geleden

    There are so many problems attached to the stretched out suburbia and its highways. Here's a pressing story by the late, but still wonderful Stuart McLean: nlcameras.info/wiki/s63caH1o04ioo6Q/video

  88. splashpit

    splashpit

    7 dagen geleden

    All those businesses don’t close at once , COVID hold my beer !

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      7 dagen geleden

      Well that would put the big box stores out of business too, so that doesn't count. :)

  89. Thomas

    Thomas

    7 dagen geleden

    4:33 some people just don't have a sense of humor

  90. davenrai

    davenrai

    7 dagen geleden

    Are there any new developments in the US/Canada which are going against the suburban experiment? Has the mindset shifted or are we still in this state of low density development?

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      7 dagen geleden

      Vancouver (in some places, anyway): nlcameras.info/wiki/iW7JnY6M2H7alW0/video As well as "New Urbanism" projects (look up the work of Andrés Duany for examples of this).

  91. Tim Gilmanov

    Tim Gilmanov

    7 dagen geleden

    кайф

  92. Luca Peterkin

    Luca Peterkin

    7 dagen geleden

    This was great. I want a part 2

  93. gb997

    gb997

    7 dagen geleden

    in America, lettuce and other produce tastes funny because of all the GMO crap they put into it. i'm not saying this sarcastically. produce tastes better in Europe imo (where a lot of that crap is banned).

  94. Jack White

    Jack White

    7 dagen geleden

    For me it looks like a miracle that one fast-food shop performs comparable to a full block of businesses. Are they all underperforming? To me it shows that this whole idea somehow almost works...

    • Not Just Bikes

      Not Just Bikes

      7 dagen geleden

      Well that's just because the building is new. If they had re-built the block using traditional development it would be several times more valuable.

  95. Masticina Akicta

    Masticina Akicta

    7 dagen geleden

    I don't understand suburbia, oh right I understand WHY they are created! Cheap Land, Easy to build nice houses on! And with a high way close by why not? Well... long distance travel to stores, work, school, and all the other things? But that was the american dream. A house out there... away from the busy city. And look at how busy and nasty suburbia's are in the end! Just think of it Football Practice, Dance Practice, Horse Riding, all has to be done by driving. A well planned organized life, but no chance to do something silly in between!

  96. Azeyzel

    Azeyzel

    7 dagen geleden

    I used to really want to visit the US at some point but honestly.. nah. Everything outside of major cities just looks so bleak. There is literally nothing pulling me there

  97. Cynthia Kazmierzski

    Cynthia Kazmierzski

    7 dagen geleden

    You didn't need to leave North America to discover walkable neighbourhoods. I've spent most of my life in urban eastern Canada, and I've never needed a car. I walk, bike, and take the bus everywhere. Conversely, the car is still king in many European suburbs.

  98. Matthew Mixon

    Matthew Mixon

    7 dagen geleden

    Excellent video and analysis. suburban sprawl has truly lead to much alienation and depression. I live in a soul crushing suburb and I'm getting out of here ASAP

  99. Jot Singh

    Jot Singh

    7 dagen geleden

    When City Planning was killed? About 100 years ago, automakers, oil companies , home and mall builders (“the Urban Sprawl Lobby”) started realizing that they could make lots of money by creating what has since become a self-perpetuating vicious cycle in communities. If politicians in communities could be convinced to ease the flow of car traffic by building enormous highways and parking lots (and subsidizing car travel by having everyone-not just motorists-pay for such roads, parking, and gasoline), huge amounts of money could be made selling cars, homes and gasoline. The process eventually was feeding on itself in a growing, self-perpetuating way, because the highways, parking and subsidies were forcing and otherwise encouraging a growing number of Americans to buy more and more cars, use more and more gasoline, and buy sprawling homes that were further and further from the town center. The public venues like libraries, YMCA, colleges, hospitals where spread far apart to force people to drive. Public transportation was deliberately underfunded and mismanaged to boost car sales. Today, all of North America, from Fairbanks Alaska to Fort Lauderdale, you will find the same soul sucking, crappy town design.

  100. Samuel Hauptmann van Dam

    Samuel Hauptmann van Dam

    7 dagen geleden

    Can't wait for the next episode!

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